The Prose & Verse of The Lotus Sutra

Chapter 2 - Ways & Means

 Text - Page 6

 

Sho

I

Sha

Ga

Nyo

Rai

Ho

Ben

This

Because

It

What

As-It-Is

Come

Ways

Means

Chi

Ken

Ha

Ra

Mitsu

Kai

I

Gu

Soku

Knowledge

Vision

(

Paramita

)

All

Already

Complete

Sufficient

"This is because the ways & means and the Paramita of knowledge and vision are completely perfected in The One That Has Come."

Sha

Ri

Hotsu

Nyo

Rai

Chi

Ken

(

Sariputra

)

As-it-is

Come

Knowledge

Vision

Ko

Dai

Jin

On

Mu

Ryo

Mu

Ge

Broad

Great

Deep

Far

Without

Limit

Without

Hesitation

Riki

Mu

Sho

I

Zen

Jo

Ge

Datsu

Power

No

Thing

Fear

Meditative

Concentration

Understand

Liberation

San

Mai

Jin

Nyu

Mu

Sai

(Samadhi)

Deeply

Enter

Without

Bounds

Jo

Ju

Is-

Sai

Mi

Zo

U

Ho

Attain

Reach

(All of the)

Not yet

Before

Had

Dharmas

"Sariputra, the knowledge and vision of The One That Come is broad and great, deep and far-reaching. With limitless, unhesitating power and fearlessness, and with meditation, concentration, emancipation and Samadhi, it deeply enters into that which is boundless and realizes all things spiritual never before known."

 

Literature          Next Page           Home

Outline of Title         Outline of Prose

Footnotes:

1. The One That Has Come: (S. Tathagata) One of the ten honorific titles of the Buddha. The one that comes down to this world from the absolute spiritual reality (S. Bhuta-tathata) to teach and deliver living beings, and then returns to it when the work is done.

2. The Three Wisdoms:
a. The Wisdom of All: The wisdom of transcendence, of emptiness
b. The Wisdom of the Various Paths: The wisdom of the limitless different ways & means, of that which is temporary
c. The Wisdom of All Kinds: The wisdom of the true spiritual aspect of reality, of the mean

3. The Five Eyes:
a. The Fleshly Eye: Seeing the physical or material world
b. The Heavenly, or Divine Eye: Seeing karma & retribution with impartialty; Seeing the pure realm of form, pure of desire
c. The Eye of Insight: Seeing the emptiness, or selflessness of all things
d. The Eye of Dharma, or Spirituality: Seeing the usefulness or provisionality of all things in the work of enlightenment
e. The Eye of Buddha, or The Eye of Enlightenment: Seeing the true spiritual aspect of reality in all things, their ultimate meaning and purpose

4. Paramita: Literally 'across to the other shore', seeing the bounds of principle and phenomena, provisionality and reality, understanding both simultaneously

5. With the box being great, so the cover is great: Understanding the limits of cognitive thinking as it tries to point to that which is beyond comprehension. The cover is the cognitive understanding that tries to cover or enclose the box.

6. Without such variable numbers: Beyond quantification or cognitive explanation

7. The Four Limitless States of Mind: a. Kindness (S. Maitri) b. Compassion (S. Karuna) c. Sympathetic Joy For Others (S. Mudita) d. Impartiality or Equanimity of Mind (S. Upeksa) The Ground of Enlightenment: The pure ground of the one spiritual realm that is beyond the limitations of self or other

8. The Four Discernments: The Unhesitating Wisdom of Eloquence in...
a. Teaching (Dharma); Literally understanding the teaching
b. Meaning (Artha); The meaning or intent of the words
c. The Terms (Nirukti); The terminology that most precisely conveys the meaning intended
d. Eloquence (Pratibhana); The most pleasing expression of the meaning

9. The Ten Powers:
a. Knowledge of what is right & wrong in every situation
b. Knowledge of the karma of every living being in the past, present & future
c. Knowledge of all stages of meditation & samadhi
d. Knowledge of the spiritual powers and capacities of all living beings
e. Knowledge of the desires and moral natures of all living beings
f. Knowledge of the spiritual conditions of all living beings
g. Knowledge of the consequences of all teachings & practices
h. Knowledge of the causes of mortality and reality of good & evil in all living beings
i. Knowledge of the ends of all living beings & nirvana
j. Knowledge of the destruction of all illusions and afflictions

10. The Four Kinds of Fearlessness:
a. In the wisdom of all (transcendence, emptiness)
b. In perfection of character
c. In facing the obstacles on the path
d. In ending suffering & affliction

11. The Surangama Samadhi: Literally the 'resolute' or 'heroic' Samadhi, that Samadhi that overcomes all obstacles and always remains without appearing or disappearing. The unretreating stage of spiritual progress on the Bodhisatva path.

12. The Eight Emancipations: Progressively deeper levels of mental concentration and freedom from attachment
a. Emancipation by observing one's attachments to all things inside (subjective thoughts) and outside (sensory objects) that are impure
b. Emancipation by only observing one's attachments to external things that are impure. One is already free of internal, subjective thoughts that are impure, having already reduced one's attachments to external phenomena only (sensory objects).
c. Emancipation by observing the illusion of those objects which appears to be pure and beautiful. Having already transcended attachments to that which is impure, one now lets go of attachments to that which appears to be pure form
d. Emancipation by observing
the boundlessness of empty space, transcending all form
e. Emancipation by observing the boundlessness of consciousness,
f. Emancipation by observation of the boundlessness of nothingness; non-substantiality
g. Emancipation by observing the boundlessness of that which is neither with nor without thoughts; beyond cognition
h. Emancipation by the final extinction of feelings and thoughts - Nirodha Samapatti

14. The King of Samadhis: The Samadhi of the Lotus Sutra

 

 Copyright Peter Johnson 2002 - All rights reserved

Copyright Policy - Contact the Author at pj@tientai.net

  

  Since July 9, 2001


FastCounter by bCentral